21st September 1916 Remembering Sapper James D. Page

 

164 James Delahunty PAGE

 

164 James Page was born in Springston,  New Zealand in 1886 to William Thomas Page and Margaret nee Delahunty. James had served 1 ½ years in the Canterbury mounted rifles before arriving in Australia in January 1910  and started working for the NSW Railways, his war record showing he was a union member.

Shortly after arriving  James had met and married Gertrude Alice Ryan in Sydney in 1911 . Gertrude was born in 1882 in Forbes, New South Wales and in 1907 gave birth to a daughter Hope Merea Ryan and the father was declared unknown. When she married James, he adopted Hope.

James and Gertrude later also had a son together, Neville John was born on 12th July 1914 .   Five weeks later his father enlisted on the 19th August 1914.

Jim as he became known by his fellow engineers enlisted as a driver and embarked on the Afric on the 18th October 1914, his signature appears ( 2nd top left) on the John Hoey Moore postcard recording many other originals in the company that shared the journey.

Signatures of originals hmats-afric.jpg enhanced
Original photo – Courtesy Jack Moore Private collection

As a driver Jim was stationed off shore during the Gallipoli landing. “The Short Account” of the formation of the 1st FCE explains how the “drivers of the company could not land their horses on the Peninsular they returned to Egypt and were encamped at mex near Alexandria during the whole of the occupation of Gallipoli”.

James during his time in Egypt had one minor indiscretion and was found in Alexandria on leave without a pass and was fined 3 days pay.

On the 16th December 1915 the Drivers arrived at Zeitoun Camp near Heliopolis, Cairo. On the 21st the drivers together with 9th and 11th reinforcements entrained for Tel-el-Kebir.

On the 28th March 1916  James and the 1st FCE embarked for France and the western front  and later in June 1916 James was remustered as a sapper.

In September 1916 the 1st FCE were stationed at Ypres and relieved the Canadians on this sector. Major Richard Dyer reported that the “trenches were in a shocking condition, no work appears to have been done for some time, the mud in some places being two feet deep”

ypres-trench-sept-1916-awm008684
Trench diagram from 1st FCE Unit War Diary September 1916

It wasn’t long before the men of the 1st FCE  were busy revetting, duck-boarding and reclaiming many of the trenches despite continued poor weather and enemy bombardments.

The poor weather continued and on the 20th September work was delayed by rain and enemy snipers who were particularly active, forced the working party that James Page was attached,  to “seek cover on many occasions”.

The following day the men pushed on determined to reclaim the trenches before the winter set in. On this day the 21st September 1916 James Page was fatally wounded by a sniper.

The company war diary confirmed that James had been sniped through a sandbag and killed by a gun shot wound to the forehead .

“A careful reliable witness” Sapper Willock also gave his account of Jim’s death, however his mention of  James having seven children was doubtful.

red-cross-report

 

There had been some confusion over the final resting place of James and in 1921 it was finally confirmed that his burial was actually at the Railway dugout burial ground. ( grave 27 Row N Plot 6)  Zillebeke , Belgium approx 1 ½ miles south, south east of Ypres.

1280px-railway_dugouts_commonwealth_war_graves_commission_cemetery_1_redvers

 

Grave 164 Sapper James.D Page
Grave 164 Sapper James.D Page (nzwargraves.org.nz)

 

In July 1917 a plea to obtain his wallet containing photos  was made to base war records. This wallet must have been of considerable sentimental value and Gertrude perhaps still too grief stricken to write herself, had a good friend Mr R Bowmaker write to the war office on her behalf . He also made inquiries regarding a gunners certificate stating that James had written to his wife and told her he had successfully passed the examination for 1st class gunnery instructor

A month later in August 1917, James Page personal effects were returned home to his wife Gertrude. A machine gunners certificate was included in his effects, a testament and a copy of the Gospel showed that he was a god fairing man and a small collection of personal items such as his hair brush, razor, photos, letters, a note book and what was described as a linen case….. perhaps this linen case was the wallet so treasured by his loving  wife.

Hopefully his memory lives on with the possibility of his son and daughter both having married and perhaps having children of their own.

Story © VanceKelly2016

 Family Notes:

Son Neville John Page ( born 1912 Marrickville , married Margaret Larkin in 1935, he died in Sandgate Newcastle 02/10/1981.

Neville John Page served in WW2 – NX71875 enlisted Paddington  Army 2nd AIF – next of kin Margaret – his war record is not digitized.

Hope Merea Page married Lindsay W Sanders in 1929 in North Sydney.

Sources:

“A Short Account of the formation of the 1st Field Engineers” – 2199 Cpl Frank Slee MM

Original photo – Courtesy Jack Moore Private collection

AWM, NAA, NLA, nzwargraves.org.nz

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