Remembering 208 Walter Gilchrist M.C MID – 3rd May 1917

Capt Walter Gilchrist MC

Captain Walter Gilchrist was an original sapper with the 1st FCE.  On this day, in 1917, he was an officer in the 6th Field Coy. Engineers, and known to be a popular officer among his men.

Several witness accounts on this day state that he was in command of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd sections of the company at Noreuil. It was recorded that on the morning of the 3rd of May he volunteered to lead an infantry battalion across to the Hindenburg Line, Bullecourt, as all the battalion’s officers had been killed or wounded.

The official war historian Charles Bean tells us what happened next…………

“None … knew who their leader was, but for half an hour or more he would be seen, bareheaded, tunicless, in grey woollen cardigan, his curly hair ruffled with exertion, continually climbing out of the trench to throw bombs or to call to the men in the shell-holes, begging them to charge.” – Charles Bean

Major William Henry Ellwood M.C  24th Infantry Battalion wrote ” Capt. Gilchrist was the bravest man I have ever known”

Sapper 14540 Palmer…. stated he saw Walter fighting with his revolver without his hat or tunic out in the open, “All the odds were against him. Then I saw him hit by a shell and killed outright.”

Sapper 14945 W.Fairley  another witness to the events  stated  “he was a specially fine soldier who did not know what fear was. I have heard that if he had lived he probably have got the V.C.”

Captain Walter Gilchrist was killed in action in France on 3rd May 1917.

He will always be remembered.

Read More…………..

 

 

 

Remembering 204 Spr. Patrick Finn Walshe

anzac-bulletin-28th-march-1917

Sapper 204 Patrick Finn Walshe died from wounds on the 5th March 1917. Today he is honoured and remembered and his story is available to read….

A portrait of Patrick Finn Walshe does exist, however he is only named in a group photo.

Which one is Patrick, or the identity of the others  is not known at this stage, however they are all Engineers from the 1st Field Company.

This photo can be viewed  and is AWM copyright protected. The photo is from the Thuillier Collection of glass plate negatives taken by Louis and Antoinette Thuillier in Vignacourt, France during the period 1916 to 1918.

The image is available to view at the following link  https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/P10550.219

Patrick Finn Walshe  ….link to his story 

The Battle of Pozieres 1916

awm-ez0097

The Battle of Pozieres

The village of Pozières, is located in the Somme Valley, France.  The main road running along the ridge, in the middle of the British sector of the Somme battlefields ran from the towns of Albert to Bapaume and close by stood the village of Pozieres, the highest point on the battlefield.

On the 19th July 1916 the men of the 1st Field company Engineers had bivouacked just outside of Albert, approximately 3 miles from the front lines. On the 21st July they marched into Albert and commenced helping to dig a communications  trench that same night. The heavy bombardments from the Germans had already commenced and were relentless.

By Sunday the 23rd July the company had moved in closer to the front lines at Pozieres and commenced construction of a strong point for a machine gun placement.

Original 233 Cpl Thomas Arkinstall reported that the section  was in front of Pozieres about 100 yards past the village , and were digging an advanced Machine Gun position overlooking two roads leading to Pozieres and Bapaume.

For four days, Pozieres would be pure hell for the men of the 1st Field Company Engineers.

 

Major Richard John Dyer was the young officer in charge of the 1st Field Company Engineers during the Battle of Pozieres.

Major Richard Dyer remarkably not quite 23 years old was the very able and hardened Gallipoli veteran, famous for his single handed efforts at  Gallipoli and his bravery at the German Officers Trench, creating his own landmark at what became known as “Dyers Crater”.

The young Major was no stranger to putting himself at great risk. However as Major and commanding officer, he was now placing his men at great risk and his diary entries show his hesitance in despatching the sections whilst under extremely heavy bombardment from the Germans.

Link to the full  1st FCE Unit diary July 1916 –July 1916 RCDIG1008590-1

The drawings above from the unit diaries showing the detailed plans for the construction of the “Strong Point” and machine gun placement.

Original 29 Bob Lundy recorded in his diary on the 23rd July the casualties and the devastation of the day, noting that there were dead laying all along the track and every inch of ground was just shell holes.

Within the first four days of the operations the return lists for the engineers prepared by  original Lieut. Robert Osborne Earle for Major Richard Dyer outlined the devastation to the men of the 1st Field Company..

The casualties list recorded the men who were either killed, wounded, missing , gassed or suffering shell shock,  between the 22nd and 26th July 1916.

 

Fourteen of the originals were included on this list of casualties…..58 Percy Hirst was listed as killed, 215 William Allan (Whelan) was listed as missing, 234  Archibald Bland  and 50 Lionel Burton-Fuller were listed as wounded.

Also wounded was 88 George Casburn, a gun shot wound to the right hand and shoulder and  163 William Rice also a gunshot wound to the shoulder.

123 William Goodwin, 76 James Hamilton, 184 Donald Clark, 237 Evelyn Lloyd..  all wounded.

336 Alfred Girdler and 157 Frederick Newson were gassed,  and 242 Thomas Cook and 26 Roland King were both listed suffering from shell shock.

Interestingly  the brothers of  fellow originals 14 Edmund Banks and 139 James Pasfield were also on the same casualty list.

Pozieres  Main street 1914                 Pozieres  Main street 1916

 On the 23rd July 234 Archie Bland died from his wounds, two days later on the 25th July both  58 Percy Hirst and 50 Lionel Fuller Burton also died from their wounds.

 

 Above Left to Right – 234 Archie Bland, 50 Lionel Fuller Burton, 58 Percy Hirst

215 William Patrick Allan Whelan  was originally reported missing on the 23rd, all later enquiries confirmed that he was killed in action on the 25th .

Searching for a Portrait
Searching for a Portrait

Still searching for a portrait of 215 William Whelan

During what became known as the “Somme Offensive”,  between the  23 July and early September 1916, the 1st, 2nd and 4th Divisions of the Australian Imperial Forces were involved in 19 attacks on German positions in and around the ruins of Pozieres.

Although the British and Australian artillery were no match for the German artillery and machine guns, despite that, they held their positions and subsequently held Pozieres at great cost. The Australians suffered 23,000 casualties while advancing only two kilometres.

Australian official historian Charles Bean  declared that the Pozières Ridge ..” is more densely sown with Australian sacrifice than any other place on earth”- Charles Bean

 

Story ©Vance Kelly 2016

Sources: AWM, NLA, NAA, Manly Library

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Sphinx Photo

 

SPHINX Sappers Photo
The men of the 1st Field Company Engineers – Original photo – Courtesy Jack Moore Private collection

While camped in Egypt during the early months of 1915, the men of the 1st FCE were tourists as well as soldiers, most of them having left the shores of Australia for the first time and very likely, none of them having ever seen the likes of ancient Egypt.

Cpl 132 Alexander McDonald  was very excited about touring the sights and wrote a letter to his brother Michael and in detail described the splendid  Pyramids, temples and of course the Sphinx of Cheops.

His letter was one of the earliest letters from the 1st FCE published.

“We (1st Engineers) got photoed today at the Sphinx, horses and all. I am the highest one in the picture. Pathe Freres moving picture man was busy taking our camp all day a few days ago, and I suppose the pictures will be out with you soon.” –  132 Alexander J McDonald

 

Ex-Woodburnite at the Front.

LETTER FROM EGYPT.

Published Richmond River Herald and Northern Districts Advertiser, Friday 5 February 1915

Sergeant A. J. McDonald, 1st Engineers, writing from Egypt to his brother,: Mr. M. McDonald, of South Woodburn,

” on 18th’ December, Sergeant McDonald says: — We went on a route march today, around the Pyramids, just at dawn, and the fog was very thick. We proceeded to the Sphinx, and I can tell you its a great piece of work. Cut out of a great, rock, the head is about 15 feet square, so it must have taken some time to carve. We next went to the Temple. This is a wonderful piece of work, and was covered in sand for about 2000 years. It was excavated a great while ago. You get into it by a tunnel. It is built of a greenish pink granite, and of great size.  I suppose every piece is 50 tons weight, and all beautifully polished 4000 years B.C., still the polish is just splendid yet. You can see it is very old and all the top is of alabaster, with some granite tiles. Some of the tiles in the roof are 26 feet, long, and 10 feet, wide, by 3ft. thick. We then went about 5 miles across the Desert to another place excavated by an American syndicate two years ago. You go down a steep incline to a great depth, and find yourself in a big chamber. The floor is of greenish pink granite paves. We measured them— 10ft. x 10ft. x 10ft, 100 tons each, and all perfectly square and polished. But the best I ever saw is the tomb of the King who reined 4000 B.C  named Clieesir (or something like that.) It is just beautiful, and I don’t think could be made in this age.

We took all the measurements and they were exact, The tomb was made out of one stone (granite), and brought 500 miles down the Nile. These objects are miles away from the Nile, so how did they get them here? And how did they lower the immense blocks down to this depth?  It beats all present day science. The Pyramids are about 350 yards each angle, and about 1500 yards in circumference. There are two large ones, and some smaller ones. They are 451 feet high, and coming to a point at an angle of about 45 degrees.  Some of the stones are 100 feet from the ground, are 76 feet long, and 10ft x 10ft, so how did they get them there? It beats creation. I have not yet been inside them, but I will tell you at a later date what it is like there.

Its proclamation day today, and the ceremonial part takes place on Sunday, when Cairo will have 50,000 troops participating in the function. Egypt is going to be a British protectorate after this. We might go to France in two months, if things are quiet here, and I hope we do, as it is nothing but sand here — hills and dales and everything, barring the Nile valley. It’s just starting to get hot, and the sand makes it ten times worse.

We (1st Engineers) got photoed today at the Sphinx, horses and all. I am the highest, one in the picture. Pathe Freres moving picture man was busy taking our camp all day a few days ago, and I suppose the pictures will be out with you soon.”–  Source: nla.news-article125934877 -Published Richmond River Herald and Northern Districts Advertiser, Friday 5 February 1915

We remain uncertain if Alexander McDonald is on the left or right at the highest point on the Sphinx, either way he is certainly among his mates from the 1st Field Company Engineers and the sphinx photo will always remain a historic and lasting memory of this unique company of men.

Alexander may never have seen this photo, sadly he died from wounds he sustained on landing day at Gallipoli, his own story linked here.

Clearly identified in the sphinx photo are the officers of the company in front standing aside their horses and the local guide seated.

 

The Officers SPHINX Sappers Photo enhanced
Front row L – R – 1st FCE Officers – Biden, Dyer, Mather, Corlette, McCall, Huntley

Original photo – Courtesy Jack Moore Private collection

 

 

Acknowledgements:

A special thank you to Jack Moore  for providing a digitised photo of the 1st FCE. This is owned by Jack Moore son of 101 John Hoey Moore DCM who has kindly granted permission to use this photo.

Photo of  132 Alexander Joseph McDonald -This photo is owned by the descendants of Alexander Joseph McDonald, Mr Ian McDonald, descendant of Michael McDonald, Alexander’s brother and is published with their kind permission – Photo presented courtesy of Mr Ian McDonald and Diane Hewson

The First Engineers and the Gallipoli Landing – by Trevor Lawton

 

FORWARD

Trevor Lawton’s discovery decades ago of  the ” FIRST ‘s “,  challenged  the war history books, and up against the heavyweights of Canberra, his research and the story of the men of the 1st Field Company Engineers fell on deaf ears. Trevor had “peaked too early” and his extensive research and his story has been patiently maturing like a good wine.

Now in the centenary years of ANZAC, that has all changed and Trevor’s early work and continued passionate campaign is not only welcomed but as he has so kindly stated, his work has found a home …”the ideal setting”.

Please read Trevor’s own story of the 1st Field Company Australian Engineers. As he so fondly calls them  the FIRST’S, he dedicates the opening chapters to the recognition of the Engineers both at ANZAC and the enormous work by the Engineers performed at Mudros before the landing campaign.

Trevor has no direct family connection to the men, and has no agenda other than being passionate about the truth, and that the fine men of this company be fully recognized and their true place in history is recorded.

He is a true campaigner. His story is rich with detail, it raises some intriguing questions and is enlightening. It gives great encouragement to continue to tell the story and share the lives of the men of the 1st Field Coy. Engineers AIF.

And as Trevor so simply states … it helps us continue to “join the dots”.

Trevor Lawton gives his own back story to his early discovery……..” Two letters to editor , Two buildings facing each other”

“So began my search to unravel the mystery of the presence of the engineers at the landing.

Sparked by the two letters I came across, more years ago than I care to remember. One misfiled at the Australian War Memorial, the other in a local paper both appearing early in WWI.

The other building, the (old) and (new) Parliament House where I worked for 20 years as a researcher and in management of Parliamentary Library….. when all was done without the aid of electronics, except ‘typing’…….only microform or hard copy. No button pressing, no instant answers. I took early retirement to spend hours of research on soldiers and their stories, not  WW1 battles.

There were few answers  to those intriguing letters till electronics delivered up Sapper diaries this century…I had ‘peaked’ too early before digitization’s of records…then came Vance’s website, the ideal setting for what follows…. I hope readers of his site will continue the quest to join the dots up….on the engineers’ story! In a previous life in a galaxy not so far away, but long long ago, I was a high school teacher, and later a research officer in Bureau of Agricultural Economics, hence my attention/ emphasis on “local”. There was little interest in such a story in the nation’s capital………”   TWL. (Trevor Lawton)

 

CHAPTER  ONE

THE LANDING 25 APRIL 1915 ANZAC COVE

REMEMBERING THE STILL OVERLOOKED FEW -THE ENGINEERS

NEW SOUTH WALES – WAS AT THE FOREFRONT.

William Echlin Turnley stood on the crowded deck of the troopship Afric peering intently into the harbour the ship convoy was entering. What he saw alarmed him. He with several thousand Australian and New Zealand troops of the First Contingent (my “First Fleet”) was now ending his voyage, the Sydney-Emden triumph still fresh in their minds. The convoy was not entering an English port as expected when leaving Sydney but Alexandria Harbour Egypt. There moored unhindered in front of him were some twenty four German merchant ships, two-thirds the number of ships the soldiers had travelled across the seas.

P07146.001 AWM portrait
84 William Echlin Turnley

A very confronting close-up first exposure to the enemy. There was nothing he could do.  (These ships were as yet idle; captured German prizes-of-war).
William Turnley could not know then that he as part of 1,500 Australian troops the first of any troops to land that fateful day, would be swapping the 36 or so troopships for 36 small rowboats heading pre-dawn towards another foreign shore…Gallipoli…Sunday 25 April 1915…Anzac Day. The 1,500 in the First Wave were part of a Covering Force of 4,000 men to prepare the way for 1 and 2 Brigades to land, in reverse order.
He later knew as a survivor, New South Wales was represented together with the “outer states” in that First Wave. When back home he would try to explain it was.
Today we still do not recognise NSW’s presence. He, Turnley would later realise he and his mates in the lead or at the forefront of the first to land rowed not into the history books but historical oblivion.
Very few of the NSW recruits actually perished early morning or that day. They have simply been overlooked then or forgotten since in the past 100 years. On landing their skills were not immediately needed, for what they expected was not there. Their other non-combatant skills were needed: these too have been largely overlooked.

WHY GALLIPOLI ?
As part of General Sir Ian Hamilton’s “rapid flinging” of troops ashore at the Gallipoli peninsula that day to try to free up access to Russia, 1,500 Australian soldiers from the so-called 6 infantry companies (Coys) made the first landing that day. They landed at only one of the six beaches chosen by him. Unlike at the other five beaches the Australians ultimately landed pre-dawn for surprise, with no preceding naval shelling bombardment announcing their arrival.

Weatherwise, “the end of April offered up the chance of a few days of consecutive charm” … for such an enterprise. “If it had been British weather the adventure would have to be given up” Hamilton later wrote.

As it was, the 6 landings were postponed two days because of strong winds.
Overlooked in the story of the Australian First Wave were members of a 7th company – the engineers, who were soldiers but not infantry. These men, sappers, were members of the 1st Field Company Australian Engineers (1FCAE), “the First engineers”.

The men of the 1st Field Company Engineers - Original photo - Courtesy Jack Moore Private collection
The men of the 1st Field Company Engineers – Original photo – Courtesy Jack Moore Private collection

In writing Volume I of the official history, 600 plus pages dealing only with the first phase to 4 May 1915 of the Gallipoli Campaign, the Official Historian CEW Bean lamented “Of the Landing…there exists no such record…from which even the shortest history could be written”.
His diaries, records of conversation and communication were all he had. (He acknowledged the contribution of 130 prominent soldiers etc and some 20 overseas official sources in enabling him to achieve publication of Volume I in only two years).
His history noted the First engineers were to be part of the First Wave ashore when the landing was being planned. To the detriment of subsequent histories thereafter, it did not give any reasons or other details for their presence. Recorded only was the number of First engineers landed up to 1 May 1915, 7 officers, 158 other ranks.
Consequently, 69 First engineers became the still overlooked few. Their omission from the official record and subsequent histories for the past century means now there are more questions than answers e.g. did the engineers land in their own boats or were they mixed with the infantry in the First Wave(?).
As fewer than 500 men from three Australian engineer companies landed that day out of some 15,000-16,000 men such an oversight is understandable. Lt Gen Birdwood reported at 4.30pm 13,000 men were ashore but the 13 and 15 Battalions (Bns) had not yet landed. They were too late for action that day.
Over 27,000 men landed at Anzac Cove by 1 May 1915 a tribute to the Royal Navy second squadron under Rear Admiral Thursby using over 20 ships including chartered vessels.  In all over 200 ships were used for the landings at the 6 beaches.
One-fifth (some 5,400) of the 27,000 men at Anzac Cover were not in Australian or NZ Bns.
Most were from the Royal Naval Division, “Winston’s Little Army”. These soldiers surplus reservists to the Royal Navy were also sailors. On the day, they made a feint or dummy landing from the sea at Bulair north of the Cove before then rushing back to the Cove.

Landed also were the Ceylon (Tea) Planters’ Rifle Corps (151 men said to be Gen Birdwood’s bodyguards), the (Jewish) Zion Mule Corps (246), the Indian Mule Cart Transport Corps (229) and various gun batteries mainly from the Indian Army.

WHY WERE THE ENGINEERS THERE?
There were few clues or answers, either in the official records or to date in unofficial sources such as the soldiers’ letters, photographs, diaries and so on.
Official orders issued by Major General Bridges on 18 March 1915 (Operation Order No.1) and by Colonel Sinclair MacLagan to the 3 Infantry Brigade on 21 March 1915 contained virtually no information. These Brigade troops were recruited from the “outer states”, Qld, SA, WA and Tasmania. MacLagan’s orders simply listed three Engineer Demolition Parties (each to contain 23 First engineers, it transpired from two official Bn diary entries but their attachment to three of the six Bn Coys was not specified nor explained).

The only clue to any attachment was given by William Turnley. The Firsts were to team with a 9Bn Coy for special demolition work at Gaba Tepe promontory. At the planning stage, it would seem 3 gun batteries were identified for capture hence 3 demolition parties(?).
Even the First engineers’ war diarist could record little of the landing as the three demolition parties were spread over three different battleships and later (three?) small boats. After landing all he could record wasit was some time before sufficient sappers could be assembled to commence a road (11.45am) to get guns, water and ammunition to the troops
higher up”.

Overlooked were any of the engineers’ other activities that day particularly of some 14 First engineers who “beached” separately that afternoon in a very unusual landing. Complicating matters, the First engineers belonged to 1 not 3 Brigade.
The remaining First engineers minus two officers, ten horse drivers and unspecified Coy HQ details landed with the Reserve 12Bn as did the remaining 6 Coys of the three Bns from destroyers in the Second Wave. That wave seems to have landed sooner than the half hour behind the First Wave indicated in orders reflecting the urgency to get inland, or the efficiency of the Royal Navy.

The Firsts were to rendezvous at map reference Square 224Q6 to undertake their tasks; principally road making and water searching. Uncertainty still remains on when and where the First Engineers landed in the Second Wave.
By now 48 small boats were employed for the landings(?).
Letters to the press by engineers Tom Newson, Queanbeyan Age and William Turnley, Sydney Morning Herald in June 1915 and May 1917 gave intriguing clues (my first and only, over 25 years ago) to the engineers’ elusive presence. Newson wrote of a “barbed wire and demolition party”, Turnley of NSW’s presence in the first to land. The next batch of war news in the press or by dreaded telegram quickly led to any such unofficial clues being overlooked or forgotten in the tumult of those days.

AWM A02468 -Troops of the 11th Battalion and 1st Field Company Australian Engineers assembled on the forecastle of HMS London, part of the fleet which carried the Australians from Lemnos for the Gallipoli landing at Anzac Cove. HMS Bacchante is steaming ahead. Photo taken by Ashmead-Bartlett, Ellis
AWM A02468 -Troops of the 11th Battalion and 1st Field Company Australian Engineers assembled on the forecastle of HMS London, part of the fleet which carried the Australians from Lemnos for the Gallipoli landing at Anzac Cove. HMS Bacchante is steaming ahead. Photo taken by Ashmead-Bartlett, Ellis

Later, photographs also provided clues. One showed a First engineer demolition party on board a battleship (HMS London) with WA 11Bn soldiers going to the landing (AWM AO2468). Another showed the body of an Australian engineer on the beach the first engineer to fall after landing (AWM A1090). There is still no official identification.
Later research or mention of individual First engineers sometimes referred to them being “among the first to land”. These included Gordon Wilson from Minmi NSW (his funeral in1929 after a car accident was attended by Charles Kingsford Smith and Charles Ulm), Tom Newson from Duntroon, Ernie Murray from Canberra and Roy Denning from Yass. But the reasons for their presence still remained unexplained.

Unless the official records yield more answers, soldier accounts in their various forms including Reveille become the prime sources for answering these questions. Here the research of 229 First engineers being conducted by Vance Kelly offers hope. But as the Official Historian warned soldiers’ recollections will yield different and often conflicting answers as anyone who has read WWI Red Cross files will readily attest.

THE FIRST ENGINEER TO FALL
Five First engineers are recorded as dying that day, with four reportedly killed in action in the First Wave.
Captain Vernon Sturdee did not go ashore until 9am well after the Covering Force had landed. He accompanied the Chief Engineer HQ to inspect the search for water by the Second engineers near Dawkins Point. Later they would inspect the road at rear of Plugge’s Plateau commenced under shrapnel fire by the First engineers just before noon.
Even later the Captain would certify the burials at sunset in one grave of four engineers in Shrapnel Valley Cemetery. Sunset later became the safest time for conducting burials. Row 1C now contains these as separate graves.

In order they are of:
Fred Reynolds, 20, single, electrical engineer from Manly NSW, (born Wellington,
New Zealand);
Walter Freebairn, aged 22-29?, single, tailor from Surry Hills, Sydney (born
Darlinghurst, Sydney);
William Moore, 27, single, sawyer, originally a first reinforcement enlisting
Melbourne (born London, England); and
Cleveland Edmund Page, 23, single, plumber, associated Auburn NSW, (born East
Maitland recorded as Newcastle, NSW).

Fred Reynolds, (regarded as the first man ashore by the family of one of his three cousins killed in the war) received posthumously a Special Mention in Despatches for Conspicuous Gallantry or Valuable Services 25 April– 5 May 1915 (MiD) by General Hamilton.

Accounts of his death vary from being the first killed in the boats to the first engineer to fall ashore.
One of his three cousins Cpl Claude Campbell 17 Bn (buried Cairo from wounds at Quinns Post) happened to be taught Sunday school at Nelanglo near Gundaroo NSW, where his father was school teacher, by my grandfather; my only connection with the engineers.

Gordon Wilson received a similar commendation for work later that day.
The fifth engineer died of wounds on the troopship turned hospital ship Clan McGillivray later that day. He was shot while giving orders that morning on the deck of an unknown destroyer. The Scourge has been suggested but as it was the ship used to convey the wounded to the now hospital ship Clan McGillivray the answer remains unclear. He was Alexander Joseph MacDonald, married, carpenter, aged 30 of Glebe Point, Sydney. (Born Braidwood, NSW, also buried row 1C.)

They were and are still five of the overlooked few….

This photo is owned by the descendents of Alexander Joseph McDonald, Mr Ian McDonald, descendant of Michael McDonald, Alexander’s brother and is published with their kind permission – Photo presented courtesy of Mr Ian McDonald and Diane Hewson
132 Alexander McDonald – This photo is owned Mr Ian McDonald, descendant of Michael McDonald, Alexander’s brother and is published with their kind permission – Photo presented courtesy of Mr Ian McDonald and Diane Hewson

 

THE IDENTIFIED
Eyewitness accounts identified three of the five, only when three sappers’ diaries emerged this century. (These diaries were foremost in starting to unravel the mystery of the Firsts’presence.)
Identified were:
– William Moore by his namesake Jack Moore, (associated 10Bn from HMS Prince of Wales);
– Cleveland Page, by Thomas Drane, (associated 11Bn from HMS London); and
– Alexander MacDonald by Roy Denning. He, the last engineer to die that day was not in the First Wave, nor was Denning.
Engineers Moore and Page were killed on the beach on landing most likely from sniper fire.
Diarist William Turnley, (associated 9Bn from HMS Queen) mentions a sapper, unnamed, who was shot and killed the third time he assisted a wounded soldier ashore. That assisted soldier may have been from the Second Wave. First engineer Warrant Officer (WO) Pantlin later recounted (1932) Spr Reynolds had safely gained the shore but on returning to assist a wounded man was killed by a head shot.

Colonel Lee, Commanding Officer (CO) 9Bn, told Pantlin he would recommend Spr Reynolds for a decoration resulting in the MiD. As WO Pantlin led the party which landed on North Beach north of the Cove, he relied on Col. Lee as the eyewitness, an example of how individual soldiers readily incorporated recollections by other soldiers into their accounts.
Turnley also referred to a “fellow” who on landing unconcernedly took out his camera and started taking photos(?).

A GLIMPSE OF THE ENGINEERS’ PURPOSE
In the landing story, time and distance have been two of the major bedevilments confusing what happened, when and where (on the water, on the beaches or on the ridges and gullies) as events unfolded that pre-dawn.
Another is not enough First Wave accounts, if extant, having been identified then and now.
The result is Second Wave accounts mainly from officers on the destroyers predominate in the Official History and subsequent histories. The First Wave has generally been passed over for lack of information or described only in the briefest of terms.

That the engineers were not infantry may have some small influence on how the story was told as did perhaps the overseas origins of many engineers. These are far less likely explanations.

The following glimpse should be viewed against such a confused background e.g. on times recorded in the official diaries, the Reserve 12Bn landed before the First Wave.

William Turnley, telephone mechanic originally from England as well as diarist, sat anxiously in his boat as did all the 1,500 during the long time of the tow of the 36 boats.
Discovery by the Turks was feared. They were seen. A shot was fired. They rowed frantically to shore. His boat was fouled on landing when another boat swung around. That boat carrying 9Bn A Coy(?) is believed by many to have landed before the first shot.

Turnley thought the engineers were among the first dozen to set foot on that part of the beach(?). He with 22 other sappers was to “blow up” the guns on Gaba Tepe promontory after the Qld Bn Coy had seized them. These guns, protected by barbed wire visible offshore, were 1 mile (1.6km) south of their intended landing, Brighton Beach south of Anzac Cove.

Because of the two deviations north in their tow, he estimated they were now 2,500 yards (2.6km) away. He heard “the spasmodic chatter” of a maxim gun on the leading steamboat to be fired as ordered “only if imperative to effect a landing”. Gun cotton was part of his equipment but he lost his spiking tool/s on landing.

9Bn B Coy was meant to take Anderson’s Knoll half a mile (800m) inland(?).
No-one got to the guns that day. The seizing of these guns, General Bridges stressed, was essential to the success of the Landing.
The main aim of the Landing, expected to be opposed, was to prevent Turkish reinforcements further north of the Cove and Mal Tepe inland from moving south to Cape Hellas, where the main attack was to take place. Hellas was not protected by “an elaborate network of trenches”- (Hamilton), yet six VCs were won that day.

If need be, the Anzac Landing could be a major feint but re-embarkation, as Birdwood urged, was impossible, leading to Hamilton’s “dig, dig, dig” entreaty.

Jack Moore (associated 10Bn, ? Coy) a mechanical engineer originally from NZ was detailed to an oar in his boat as it only had two naval ratings to row it. He thus had his back to the shore and was not first out of his boat. He did not mention the “skirmish” between two boats, one occupied by AG (“Gertie”) Butler 9Bn Medical Officer and the other boat Lt Talbot Smith 10Bn Scouts as noted by Bean. One possibility is he was in a separate engineers’ boat(?).
Moore’s boat may have been the first of all to land. He expected to encounter barbed wire and spiked pits on Brighton Beach. Carried by him were a wire cutter and grappling hook with stout rope 100 feet long (30m) to drag the barbed wire once cut aside so the infantry could charge.

There was neither wire nor staked pits, just largely recently vacated trenches. He did not mention any guns to be “blown up” so with no barbed wire he joined the bayonet charge.

John Hoey Moore
101 – John Hoey Moore – photo courtesy of his son Jack Moore

 

Around noon the next day he was ordered back to the beach to help build a “wharf”.
Tom Newson (HMS London?), the English carpenter from Duntroon and letter writer to The Queanbeyan Age, was also in a barbed wire cutting and demolition party. He landed “2 miles (3.2km) north of Gaba Tepe ” promontory and “our boat was the first to land”.

He joined the bayonet charge and shouted till he was hoarse. He “would never forget that day”. He did not mention the guns…

Thomas Drane (HMS London, ? Coy), a tailor, also from England and Forbes NSW, was in the first boat “nearest the enemy” on the north side of Anzac, the one party meant to land on the Cove. His boat it seems landed last of those carrying the demolition engineers as it was further offshore. He did not know why they landed in the “wrong place”, later told it was “the current”. The associated 11Bn Coys were meant to seize the high ground at Scrubby Hill and further north Battleship Hill.

Drane did not state his purpose. WO Pantlin leader of that party stated later their objective was to “blow up” the guns.
Drane lost his sandbag containing a small pick and shovel on landing but kept his rifle. His “coldest Turkish bath ever” confirmed General Hamilton’s “like lightning they (the Australians) leapt ashore”. He joined the bayonet charge and “must have gone 5 miles [8km] before 9am that day”, perhaps “one of the more adventurous spirits” noted by Bean.

He worked on a captured trench that night on the second ridge and did not rejoin his company till two days later to find he had been reported missing-in-action. Both Turnley and Drane, wounded shortly after, were discharged medically unfit in 1916.
Moore severely wounded in the shoulder May 1915 did not resume front line duty until August 1916 with another engineering Coy, 14FCAE.

THEN, LATER…
About 6.30am that morning the Nizam steamed slowly allowing Henry Bachtold, an honours engineering graduate from England promoted to full lieutenant that day and up to 13 First engineers (his accounts vary) to offload three rafts and “pontoon equipment” into the sea.

Henry Bachtold - AWM P05097.002
Lt. Henry Bachtold – 1917

Lt Bachtold led the first reinforcements on Berrima from Melbourne in December 1914. By 8am they had linked these together but it would be 1pm before a destroyer could tow the assembly to within 200 yards (208m) of Anzac Beach. They succeeded in getting to shore to erect the first pier. The Australian Army Medical Corps used it immediately to evacuate the wounded, the severely wounded to the hospital ship Gascon, the less severely to the Clan McGillivray, the Firsts acting as traffic control.

Over four days 4 piers, two largely from broken barges, were erected, feats seemingly unnoticed in any Anzac history.
THUS…
The First engineers recruited in NSW were a small and potentially significant part of the First Wave to land. The “mother state” as claimed by William Turnley in 1917 was at the forefront if not the lead of that wave.

There is now more to vindicate his claim. The absence of barbed wire and the failure of the infantry to capture the guns (other than three Krupp guns by 8am) largely explains the engineers’ omission from the Official History(?). Also missing was their other activities. (Even the engineers’ history is vague on that day)

One surprising aspect, however, was the1930s debate of the first man ashore did not lead to the First engineers being considered. At the time 1937-38 the Official Historian gave support to “tradition” i.e. Lt Duncan Chapman was the first man ashore. Seemingly Major JC Robertson for one had disappeared to be replaced by Lce Sgt Joseph Stratford, born NSW, promoted by The Sydney Mail.
Arguably given the role of barbed wire removal, a First engineer was likely first ashore(?).  This “conclusion” may conflict with orders that an officer was to land first, other ranks remaining seated. These orders presumably applied only to the infantry(?). At an Afric reunion in 1932 WO Pantlin claimed Spr Reynolds was the first ashore. His statement did not gain much traction and failed to attract the attention of the Official Historian at that time(?).
By the 1960s Bean acknowledged that Chapman was probably the first ashore.
Perhaps by the end of the Centenary Years and the completion of Vance Kelly’s work many of these questions(?) will have more complete answers. Given the confusion surrounding the day’s events, definitive answers may not be forthcoming. Such outcomes will ease the angst of the citizens of Maryborough Qld who raised funds to erect a statue of Duncan Chapman before the Centenary and serve to modify Kiwi glee from thinking a Maorilander was the first ashore…

P02226.014 2nd Field Company Australian Engineers reach the beach
P02226.014 2nd Field Company Australian Engineers reach the beach

 

The Second engineers, also overlooked, landed 6.30-7am with similar tasks, water supplies and road making at MacLagan’s Ridge and Shrapnel Valley. They were to land with grapnels and bags to deal with barbed wire. Later, a party of them would be detailed to assist with pier construction.
Another, the Third engineers landed later that morning having been replaced by the First engineers in the First Wave even though they had returned from canal defence to Mena Egypt shortly before the 3 Brigade departed for Lemnos.

Their diary has no entry for that day but constructing water slides was an earlier activity.
The First engineers colours? A purple patch issued only weeks before to be worn on the shoulder.

"A" on Purple Patch

CHAPTER TWO

REMEMBERING THE FIRSTS OF THE OVERLOOKED -FIRST ENGINEERS
LANDINGS AND INTENDED LANDINGS.
The small boat grounded near shore. William Turnley may have followed Lt Mather in leaping over the side into the water to wade to land(?). Lt Mather was the first of any troops to land. He was a First engineer: an original of the company formed Sydney August 1914.

Lieut. Mather Leslie Frank Strang
Lieut. Leslie Frank Strang Mather

His landing was two days after the 3 Brigade and First engineers had reached their destination. Within four days two other sections of the Firsts had gone ashore.
Ahead of Lt Mather lay a windswept, stony landscape but green, unlike the familiar sand of Egypt. This land was to be a staging post for that now not-so-distant shore….. Gallipoli………the Greek island of Lemnos.
The First engineers could not know then that this might be their first rehearsal for a later first landing by them.

It was early March 1915. They did know a small party of 21 First engineers had already left from Egypt to go to the Dardanelles Straits to be part of an intended landing demolition party later on 18 March 1915: the day of the Royal and French Navies’ attempt to capture the Dardanelles Straits.
There was much to do on the island, and the First engineers with others may not get all done before they moved again. Troopships from England and France were beginning to mass in the area. The 3 (Australian) Brigade was already in Mudros Harbour, Lemnos.

MUDROS HARBOUR LEMNOS
The First engineers as the first ashore had first to ensure the adequacy of water supplies as instructed by GHQ, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force. This included examining the water supply used by the “old town” from springs in the hills, digging wells for watering animals and erecting a new pier on a “spot considered suitable by the Naval Authorities”.

Then because there were no port facilities, they had to prepare aids to allow the transport ships to land their cargoes and have the harbour ready to cater for the coming vessels. William Turnley after two months in Egypt had more to occupy his mind now than the German merchant ships anchored in Alexandria Harbour Egypt. Leaving Australia in October 1914 with the First Convoy seemed so long ago. In sailing from Sydney the Firsts and the Australian Army Service Corps occupied the fore of the Afric with 1Bn 1 Brigade aft.

His unit had brought wagons and 56 horses with them on another ship from Sydney.
While at Mena Camp, the Firsts helped “terrorise” Cairo with subsequent pay fines or other penalties. As well as enduring training and routine drills in the sinking sand, they erected at least two bridges then dismantled them.

Demolition training seems not to have been mentioned at all, other than very early training in Sydney Harbour. Some engineers did examine the guns on the battleship before resting to be ready for landing pre-dawn.
On 28 February 1915, the remaining First engineers sailed with 3 Brigade from Egypt to Lemnos island. They took 1 NCO, 10 (horse) drivers and 22 horses with them on another ship, Devanha. Earlier, on 14 February 1915, two pontoon wagons and one trestle wagon each constructed at the railway workshops Cairo and 19 draught horses were taken on strength. Eleven more men followed on 23 February as drivers of the pontoon and trestle waggons, the Chief Engineer HQ recorded. These additions cannot be confirmed as there was no 1FCAE diary for that month. No engineers’ horses nor waggons landed at Anzac Cove because of the terrain. All horses were thus returned to Mex near Alexandria, Egypt in June under WO Pantlin. He was then retired from the Army on age grounds. Some (one?) of the drivers possibly beached with the first pier(?).

MUDROS HARBOUR, GREECE. 1915-04. HORSES, MEN AND EQUIPMENT BEING LOADED ONTO TRANSPORTS AND BOATS FROM THE SHORE PRIOR TO THE ALLIED LANDING AT GALLIPOLI.
MUDROS HARBOUR, GREECE. 1915-04. HORSES, MEN AND EQUIPMENT BEING LOADED ONTO TRANSPORTS AND BOATS FROM THE SHORE PRIOR TO THE ALLIED LANDING AT GALLIPOLI.

As part of the attempted Naval Forcing of the Dardanelles, the landing demolition party comprising 20 sappers under Lt Huntley of the First engineers had combined with four officers and 200 other ranks of Chatham Battalion of the Royal Naval Division. They sailed on the Cawdor Castle to the Straits only to witness the loss or damage to French and British naval ships from Turkish mines.

They did not land for demolition work so arrived back at Lemnos on the Suffolk late March. [Lt Huntley, the First engineers’ leader for that party, from the delightfully named Snail’s Bay Balmain, later died of wounds 4 May 1915. He had two funerals: a burial at sea from the hospital ship Gascon; and a burial on Gallipoli as a photograph of his grave later showed(?).]

Huntley1
2nd Lieutenant Clive Neilson Reynolds Huntley

 

“DOINGS” OF THE FIRSTS
Water supplies remained inadequate despite engineer efforts in building a reservoir. They sank six wells to an average depth of 26 feet (6+ metres) but total supplies were reckoned to be adequate only for a few thousand men. The 1 and 2 Brigades from NSW and Victoria respectively were thus shipped back to Egypt. So was the Royal Naval Division minus
engineers. The 3 Brigade, apart from 9Bn and sometimes 10Bn, stayed mainly on board ships in Mudros Harbour.

Raft construction was an onboard engineer activity. However barrel piers were not used for the first piers. The ship Armadale apparently carried them(?). [No further information has been sought by me].
To remedy the lack of port facilities at Mudros, the engineers in the few weeks they were there combined at times with the Royal Naval Division engineers and 9 (Australian) Bn to build port, landing, communications and navigation aids. Shore beacons and signal hut/barracks were erected for the Royal Navy at the narrow mouth of the harbour.

The First engineers also began to erect, as instructed by “the Naval Authorities”(?) a stone jetty 75 yards (78m) long with assistance from 9Bn making a road to it from Mudros village mid March in “cold wet windy conditions”. The jetty may not have been completed. As well the Firsts unloaded HMS Pickaxe. Further unloading and restowing of ships wrongly loaded before leaving England and Egypt was completed as was assisting moving a stationary hospital ashore, using a hopper dredge from the Royal Navy. Some road repairs were done.
This following photographs are from an album of a R.N.D. officer [courtesy of Maurice Stokes (UK) and Bernard de Broglio (Aus)].

These show, as captioned –
“Pier building at Mudros March ’15
1. The R.N.D. Engineers
2. The Australians”
Note the shipping in the background.
Also noteworthy was the Firsts’ attempt to float assembled rafts and pontoons as a pier across Mudros Harbour only to crash on landing and the assembly break up.

 

Pier Building Mudros 1915

 

THE LANDING TAKES SHAPE
On 10 April, the Firsts learned they were to be part of the first landing party on Gallipoli together with 5 or 6 unspecified infantry Coys. They practised for a few days with the chosen 6 companies in disembarking from troopships (battleships on the day) rushing ashore from small boats etc. The intended landing was postponed two days by strong winds.

Because of other equipment to be carried the engineers were to carry 50 rounds only of ammunition.  So 69 First engineers came to land at North Beach (23) and Anzac (46), rather than the Cove and Brighton Beach to the south. The first pier was erected and within a few days sandbag walls were erected for shelter from shrapnel around an Australian and separate NZ dressing station on the beach.
Many of the skills practised previously, including pier erection(?), were used by the First engineers that day. And a few of them had extensive military or militia experience at times as long as the time they had spent training for their professional/trade vocations. On route from Australia to Egypt, this experience showed when the Firsts easily defeated the infantry in a rifle drill competition, winning first and second prize, the Australian Army Service Corps coming third and fourth, the six infantry entries thereafter.

To the then official press representative CEW Bean in his first report on the landing, reproduced in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette 17 May 1915, the First Wave seemed to consist “largely of miners from Broken Hill and Westralian goldfields”. He was not sure which boat landed first as many seemed to land at the same time. That time was 4.18am. He did not go ashore until about 10am that morning.
No First engineers were miners. Yet they well and truly earned the titles of “sapper” and “digger” in the next 4 years. The Engineers motto then? “We make and we break”.

CHAPTER THREE

REMEMBERING THE FIRST DAY FALLEN
THE BIGGER PICTURE
In recounting the Australian Landing story the bigger picture has prevailed to the detriment of detail such as knowing how many died that day, their names or who they were. Our story and remembrance have suffered from such oversights.
Some First Day Gallipoli Honour Rolls e.g. by the then now revived former ADFA AIF Project or by the Australian Light Horse Studies Centre have appeared in recent years mainly on the internet without seeming to attract much widespread public attention(?).

The still overlooked few thus increases to more than one thousand men when added to the overlooked First engineers.
Unknown until 2014 were the names of those who perished in the landing’s First Wave of 1,500 men.

FIRST WAVE DEATHS
Research Professor Peter Stanley ADFA Canberra gave us the number, their names and much about these men. His research now enables comparison of First Wave losses with later and total losses that day. We can also learn how various units fared and where and when their time came to rush ashore thanks to Brigadier Chris Roberts (Rtd ) and the Australian Army History Unit.
Professor Stanley did well to challenge us to name just one Anzac soldier who perished that day, highlighting such oversights. To me he reinforced our “one day of the year” only approach to remembrance despite growing Anzac Day attendances.

First engineer William Turnley survived though retired early medically so he can be farewelled in appreciation of his contribution, then and now, with the hope he and his fellow engineers receive some overdue recognition in the Centenary years.
First Wave deaths can now be identified by country and Australian states. (Incidentally, Professor Stanley’s List of Lost Boys coincides very closely with data in AWM Honour Roll Series 148 (microform) in 1999. Only two deaths recorded in the latter as 1 or 2 May and another four with probable dates e.g. 25-27 April are now recorded as 25 April as a result of his findings).

DEATHS BY COUNTRY/AUSTRALIAN STATE:

Lawton deaths landing page 15 cropped.jpg

SOURCES: Derived from: (1) Professor Stanley’s List of Lost Boys 1914 in “Lost Boys of Anzac”
(2014); (2) AWM Series 148 (microform) Trevor Lawton (1999 unpublished).
Almost one-third of those killed in the First Wave were born overseas, with UK including
Ireland making up one-quarter of the total. These men were going home to fight for their own countries not to fight at Gallipoli. Queensland lost the most 44 with WA 32 and SA 25, when those figures are added to Australian state figures.

FIRST DAY DEATHS
The following listing shows how various units fared against rushed in Turkish reinforcements when their time to land came.

Lawtons landing deaths page 16 Cropped

NOTES
(1) Battalions in action 25 April only: excludes 13 and 15 Bns.
(2) Court of Inquiry could not establish a definite date of death so probable date ranges given e.g. 25-27 April.
(3) The covering force of 4,000 men.
(4) All Landing times are approximate only. Actual times could vary significantly from those stated.
(5) Total includes 6 deaths now ascribed to 25 April
(6) Times landed are uncertain: both am. and pm.(?)
(7) Totals may vary from other rolls (a) disputed or uncertain dates (b) errors and omissions (c) later updates/corrections to AWM Honour Roll. (d) different time period or date range covered.
Includes additional 4, 1 from HQ, 2 from 3 Field Ambulance, 1 First engineers
SOURCE: Derived from: AWM Series 148 (microform). Trevor Lawton (1999 unpublished)

THE BILL
When deaths from 25 April – 2 May (where a court of inquiry sometimes over 18 months later could not establish a definite date) plus died of wounds (DoW) 25 April are included, SA lost the most another 26. The chief reason is the wounded could not be found in the dense scrub. At day’s end Qld still lost the most some 90 while SA and WA had similar losses 56 and 62 respectively.
The Reserve 12Bn losses were higher than either 10 or 11 Bns at 73.
Almost half of each of the 9, 10 and 11Bns’ losses occurred in the First Wave of the six Coys e.g. 44 out of 90 for Qld, 84 of whom were killed that day. If deaths from died of wounds to 2 May (inconclusive dates again) some 140 could be added giving a total of 886, too high a figure to reflect actual first day losses.
Again at day’s end, Victoria suffered the most, the 7 and 6Bns (in order landed) losing 150 and 110 respectively.

POSTSCRIPT
The (Jewish) Zion Mule Corps landed 6 officers and 240 other ranks as supplies and water carriers on Anzac Cove up to 1 May 1915. When that component was disbanded and returned, minus mules, to Egypt 20 May 1915 it reportedly lost 15 men and 55 wounded.
These figures suggest a high casualty rate but are difficult to verify.
So too are deaths of naval ratings (“blue jackets”) of the Royal Navy at Anzac Cove difficult to reconcile with those given anecdotally in Anzac accounts e.g. the midshipman killed after handing AG “Gertie” Butler his satchel on landing. Recent research overseas with more required as acknowledged yields only 6 Royal Navy deaths in the second squadron.
Similarly the numbers killed in the boats or drowned on landing will never be known. There are no facts to match against the somewhat fictional (like AB Facey’s landing) accounts.
To give the Official Historian the last say on the Landing “Neither then nor anytime later was the beach the inferno of bursting shells, barbed wire entanglements and falling men that has sometime been described or painted”.
Finally losses each day in the landing period as defined by him did not approach those of first day losses of Bns in action that day until 2 May 1915. On that day, 16Bn (WA) lost 151, 2Bn 102 and 1Bn (both NSW) 64, 317 out of some 450 deaths. These 450 deaths do not include deaths from 13 and 15Bns. Thus the 450 figure shown should not be construed as total deaths for 2 May 1915.

THE SPIRIT LIVES.
Yet we cannot remember what we do not yet know or have forgotten.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
 The Official History of Australia in the War 1914-18 Volume I. The Story of Anzac
by CEW Bean (1 & 4 edition)
 Australian War Memorial, National Archives and National Library of Australia
microform and digitised records etc
 1FCAE diarists
 Naval-history.net for Royal Navy deaths: Zion Mule Corps various websites
 Professor Peter Stanley, Catherine Job, “Amazing” Jack Moore, son of Anzac Jack,
Terence King, belatedly Vance Kelly
 My son Stephen for keying over 2+ years endless drafts…and yes, Stephen there is
still one more…this is it!
Trevor Lawton Canberra, December 2015
E&OE
(Thus ends my “Magnum Opeless” sparked over a quarter of a century ago by happenstance: two letters to the Editor. In that context, “make
or break” seems apt to describe my efforts in finding answers to the questions those letters raised). TWL 2015

© Trevor Lawton December 2015

 

Extra photos and Images have been provided by this website and appropriate acknowledgments and courtesy captioned.

 

Marcus Clark

 

16 Marcus A Clarke portrait
16 Driver Marcus Adamson Clark

 

16 Driver Marcus Adamson Clark

One of the youngest to volunteer was 19 year old 16 Marcus Adamson Clark, another  strapping young fellow from country Narandera. He was a blacksmith and farrier and at 5 ft 10” and 12 stone he was one of the youngest and fittest in the company. He also couldn’t wait to get on a horse and get to Sydney as quickly as possible to enlist as he enlisted on the 1st day and was assigned service number 16.

Marcus was also a skilled Horseman and was featured in the Sydney Mail in January 1916.

Marcus and Horse 2
Incorrectly titled Trooper.

Marcus Clark’s story is available and offers some insights into the driver’s of the 1st FCE.

Please read his story……………..click here

108 Walter Stallard – MM

AWM P08526.002 108 Walter Stallard

 108 Walter Stallard – MM

” his presence and cool demeanour “

Walter was a 19 year old carpenter from Merewether, Newcastle NSW, a community that had shown vigorous patriotic support for the war effort.

The photo above is courtesy of the AWM, a pre-enlistment studio portrait of Walter Stallard clearly showing a “presence and cool demeanour” which would serve him well during the entire World War 1 campaign.

Walter Stallard enlisted on 22 August 1914 and embarked with the 1st Field Company Engineers from Sydney on HMAT Afric on 18 October 1914.

Apart from being a “Dawn Lander” and one of the first Novacastrians to set foot on Gallipoli, Walter had managed to dodge both snipers and illness right up to the 8th August 1915.

“One of the most famous assaults of the Gallipoli campaign, the Battle of Lone Pine was originally intended as a diversion from attempts by New Zealand and Australian units to force a breakout from the ANZAC perimeter on the heights of Chunuk Bair and Hill 971. The Lone Pine attack, launched by the 1st Brigade AIF in the late afternoon of 6 August 1915 pitched Australian forces against formidable entrenched Turkish positions, sections of which were securely roofed over with pine logs. In some instances the attackers had to break in through the roof of the trench systems in order to engage the defenders. The main Turkish trench was taken within 20 minutes of the initial charge but this was the prelude to 4 days of intense hand-to-hand fighting, resulting in over 2,000 Australian casualties.” – Source: AWM

On the 8th August at the Battle of Lone Pine  young Walter was wounded by shrapnel in the arm and also suffering from shock,  he was transferred to hospital in Mudros. His fellow sapper 107 John Slattery was wounded the previous day, but Walter would have been completely unaware that John would die from his wounds and was buried at sea on this day.

This would not be the only major battle for young Walter, and not the only time he would be wounded in action. Each time Walter was wounded he would recover and  return to the field and some of the fiercest battles that the Anzac’s had seen.

 

C04119 cropped
Walter Stallard first on the extreme left of the photo above – Mudros 1915 – An Evelyn Lloyd photo.

 

Pozieres, is a small village in the Somme Valley in France, and was the scene of bitter and costly fighting for the 1st, 2nd and 4th Australian Divisions in mid 1916. The Battle for Poziers was considered the heaviest bombardment that the allied forces had ever seen in the entire war. It was 7 weeks of continual shelling day and night.

On 1st June 1916, Poziers, Walter was wounded a second time, a gun shot wound to his right thigh and his face and this time he was transferred back to hospital in England to recover. Within four months he had fully recovered and in November 1916 he returned back to the field in France.

 

Fast forward October 1917 – The Western Front Again

The following is an excerpt from “Cameos of the Western Front” – Ypres sector 1914 – 1918 by authors Tony Spagnoly and Ted Smith, it describes the scene that the Anzac’s faced the morning of the 4th October 1917 at Ypres. The land they were fighting over had been held by the Germans since 1914.

“In the early hours of the 4th October , the mass of 1 and 2 Anzac lay crowded along the front line, with a fair proportion of the men placed nearer to the enemy positions than would have been favoured by the planners. Due to the large area of boggy Flanders mud……..several units had to be positioned close up to the enemy lines. Unseen before them , in the dark along the lower slopes of the Broodseinde ridge, lay several fortified farms the enemy would bitterly contest…………………………..the Australians planned to attack at 6.00 am , but about 5.30 am, as they were quietly waiting………Desultory German fire, which had been falling intermittently among the Australians, grew in intensity…..observers further back , grew tense with worry and anxiety. The enemy fire increased pummeling the front line troops…..and British gunnery supports further behind the line. had the enemy anticipated the proposed advance ?.

The fire began to take a heavy toll of the waiting men. casualties were mounting alarmingly….After a seemingly endless half an hour, the line of the barrage was well-defined by the dead and wounded lying thickly around…….At exactly 6 a.m a split second silence was shattered by marker flares sizzling up into the lightning sky. Then the thunderous British barrage rent the air, drowning the enemy fire into insignificance. The German positions , all across the ridge , were now wreathed in a ferment of  fire and destruction. The Australian Infantry, thankful to have survived the terrible shelling , hoisted themselves off the wet ground …..casually lit their cigarettes, cocked their steel helmets against flying shrapnel, gripped their rifles and followed their officers into enemy territory.”

On this day the 1st Field Company Engineers would be recognised for their enormous contribution to the success of the day.  The Anzac’s had once again displayed unswerving determination  and bravery in this attack and six original members of the 1st FCE would be awarded the Military Medal, 66 Norman Masters, 99 John Jackson , 119 William Pitt, 153 Phillip Charmichael, 67 Albert Currie and 108 Walter Stallard.  Two Australians from the 3rd Division were also awarded the Victoria Cross, such was the significance of this battle.

 

WW1 - Military Medal - "For Bravery In the Field"
WW1 – Military Medal – “For Bravery In the Field”

 

The following is the official citation for 108 Walter Stallard.

‘During the operations east of YPRES on 4th October 1917, he was employed on the construction of a strong point on BECELAERE RIDGE. Notwithstanding the constant shell and machine gun fire directed on his post throughout the day he rendered very valuable assistance to his section officer and later on to his section N.C.O.s. in setting out the task and supervising the work. He was constantly encouraging his men by his presence and cool demeanour and was responsible to a large extent for the excellent post constructed.’
Source: ‘Commonwealth Gazette’ No. 31
Date: 7 March 1918

MILITARY MEDAL

 

The indestructible Walter finally returned home to Australia on the troop ship Port Sydney (formerly the Star of England) on the 2nd December 1918. He was lucky to share the journey home with some of the original sappers who had all signed up together 4 years earlier. On the same troop ship were nine of Walters mates, the equally indestructible 174 Everleigh Hodges MM, 12 Thomas Rose, 42 Roland York, 38 William Smith , 250 Fred Wicks DCM, 130 Leonard Johnstone, 177 Reginald Jessop MSM , 176 William Harvey, and 207 Norman McKee.

For these men who had survived four hard years at war, it must have seemed a lifetime ago when they last left the shores of Australia. It is impossible to imagine their thoughts and stories they must have shared on that return trip.  But no doubt the journey would have been a welcome respite,  filled with anticipation of the reception they would receive when they finally landed home on Australian shores.

The Merewether community were eagerly awaiting Walter’s return and anticipated his arrival on Saturday 30th November and had prepared a celebration for Walter and other returning soldiers. Walter’s arrival was delayed in Melbourne and the celebrations for Walter were simply postponed and it appears even more effort went into a more formal reception for this brave young man a few days later when he arrived by train.

 

DISTRICT NEWS – MEREWETHER

Published -Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate – Friday 6 December 1918.

“Corporal Walter Stallard, a returned Anzac, was officially met at the Newcastle Railway Station last evening, where two motorcars and municipal representatives, a number of relatives and friends, were in waiting. Corporal Stallard joined the car with Alderman R. Wells, the Mayor, and Mr. T. Adams, the town clerk, and was conveyed to his father’s residence, in Alworth street. Prior to leaving the railway station, Alderman R. G. Kilgour, the Mayor of Newcastle, welcomed Corporal Stallard, on behalf of Newcastle, and wished him long life and prosperity.

A large number of residents extended their felicitations to Corporal Stallard upon arrival at Merewether. The Mayor told that Corporal Stallard was one of the original Anzacs, and had been away from his home for four years, defending the liberties of Australia and the Allied nations. They were glad to see him home safe and sound, and he had pleasure to accord him a welcome on behalf of the citizens. Alderman Dixon supported the welcome, and said that the council should give welcomes to all the returning soldiers. Mr. Friend said that Corporal Stallard was an apprentice in his employ, and he was proud that he had done his duty. Corporal Stallard expressed his pleasure with the welcome which had been extended to him.”

Source: nla.news-article137492365

 

There is a strong sense that  Walter was very much the “quiet achiever”, perhaps a man of few words but a determined young man who didn’t shy away from danger and maintained that cool demeanour and bravery through to the end. His hand written application for the Gallipoli Medallion in 1967 is possibly the simplest and shortest hand written letter this researcher has found.  A simple request with his regimental details and no mention of his Military Medal.  Walter’s quiet modesty was so typical of many of the Anzac’s and perhaps characteristic of his approach to life after the war. Walter lived a long life and passed away in 1981, he was a great Australian.

 

service 5
Walter Stallard’s application for the Gallipoli Medallion

 

This Day and Forever more – Remembering  108 Walter Stallard -MM

 

 Story Copyright Vance Kelly2015